Virtual Guidebook to El Camino Real
Mission San Antonio de Padua - Inside
Fort Hunter Liggett in the Jolon Valley California


Mission San Antonio presents all the features of a typical Franciscan mission - a simple rectangular church and a quadrangle of low buildings surrounding a courtyard with a fountain. Both the inside and outside walls have rows of columns supporting a broad overhang. The campanario (bell wall) stands twelve feet in front of the church, forming a sheltered porch.

After secularization of the missions the lands were sold but nobody wanted the mission, which reverted to the Catholic church. It decayed slowly, accelerating in 1894 when the roof tiles were removed and used on the Southern Pacific Railway station in Burlingame. Limited restoration began in 1903 but was stymied by the earthquake of 1906. Comprehensive restoration began in 1928. In the 1950's the Franciscan order resumed responsibility for the mission and brown-robed monks once again lived there.

A second cycle of restoration is now underway, to meet state requirements for seismic safety. All the heavy roof tiles have been removed, the buildings reinforced with an internal steel frame, then re-roofed.



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The iconic campanario (bell wall) at Mission San Antoniop

(April 25, 2008)


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South-facing colonnade and the museum entrance at Mission San Antonio

(April 25, 2008)


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Mission San Antonio's cloister and interior garden

(April 25, 2008)


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The fountain in the cloister garden at Mission San Antonio

(April 25, 2008)


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Inside the church at San Antonio Mission

(April 25, 2008)


Next Locality: Mission San Antonio de Padua - Outside